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7 Frozen Shrimp Recipes (Slideshow)

7 Frozen Shrimp Recipes (Slideshow)



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October 15, 2013

By

Emily Jacobs

Frozen shrimp is easy to cook with and delicious

Easy Coconut Shrimp Recipe

Another delicious favorite of our clients who ask for these year-round! Yeah, they’re that awesome… Serve them with our apricot Sriracha dipping sauce.

Click here to see the Easy Coconut Shrimp Recipe

Curry Grilled Shrimp Recipe

This are one of the easiest ways to do shrimp. They have just four ingredients, so you can easily serve these for your next party.

Click here to see the Curry Grilled Shrimp Recipe

Barbecue Grilled Shrimp Recipe

Use this recipe for a healthier alternative to meat. It's light and still has that barbecue flavor.

Click here to see the Barbecue Grilled Shrimp Recipe

Honey-Glazed Shrimp Recipe

To make a sweeter-tasting shrimp, use honey. This recipe is both quick and easy to make for any occasion.

Click here to see the Honey-Glazed Shrimp Recipe

Shrimp Kebabs Recipe

This is a great party food and a fun way for your kids to help with dinner.

Click here to see the Shrimp Kebabs Recipe

Shrimp Scampi with Wilted Spinach Recipe

A classic dish great for using frozen shrimp.

Click here to see the Shrimp Scampi with Wilted Spinach Recipe

Marcia’s Holiday Shrimp Toasts Recipe

Our clients ask for these every year and our kitchen makes ridiculous amounts of these during the holiday season. The secret's out, and we’re sharing our recipe with you. You’ll thank us, trust me!

Click here to see the Marcia’s Holiday Shrimp Toasts Recipe


Classic shrimp recipes: Scampi and de Jonghe

Q: Just wondering if you have any baked shrimp recipes or recipes that featured baked shrimp?

—Kay Daniels, Downers Grove

A: There are a number of baked shrimp recipes out there, so I asked Kay to narrow the field down. Here's her reply: "I was looking for a recipe for the shrimp to be the main ingredient. I prefer something with garlic and butter. I would like the shrimp to be oven baked or oven roasted. The shrimp I would like to serve over rice. I also would like to use frozen shrimp. I do realize it needs to be defrosted."

Could you broil the shrimp, Kay? If so, I'd go right for this scampi dish from Pierre Franey, which was featured in his 1979 book, "The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet." This recipe has long provided me with a framework when I've wanted a simple, garlicky shrimp dish to spoon over rice. I'd adjust the quantity of ingredients, throw some butter in with the olive oil, skip the parsley, use hot sauce instead of red pepper flakes, but the basic cooking instructions and timing stayed steady. You could bake it too, but remember the shrimp will take longer to cook — and long cooking can kill them, turning the shrimp dry and leathery. So keep basting the shrimp with the pan liquids to keep them moist.


Classic shrimp recipes: Scampi and de Jonghe

Q: Just wondering if you have any baked shrimp recipes or recipes that featured baked shrimp?

—Kay Daniels, Downers Grove

A: There are a number of baked shrimp recipes out there, so I asked Kay to narrow the field down. Here's her reply: "I was looking for a recipe for the shrimp to be the main ingredient. I prefer something with garlic and butter. I would like the shrimp to be oven baked or oven roasted. The shrimp I would like to serve over rice. I also would like to use frozen shrimp. I do realize it needs to be defrosted."

Could you broil the shrimp, Kay? If so, I'd go right for this scampi dish from Pierre Franey, which was featured in his 1979 book, "The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet." This recipe has long provided me with a framework when I've wanted a simple, garlicky shrimp dish to spoon over rice. I'd adjust the quantity of ingredients, throw some butter in with the olive oil, skip the parsley, use hot sauce instead of red pepper flakes, but the basic cooking instructions and timing stayed steady. You could bake it too, but remember the shrimp will take longer to cook — and long cooking can kill them, turning the shrimp dry and leathery. So keep basting the shrimp with the pan liquids to keep them moist.


Classic shrimp recipes: Scampi and de Jonghe

Q: Just wondering if you have any baked shrimp recipes or recipes that featured baked shrimp?

—Kay Daniels, Downers Grove

A: There are a number of baked shrimp recipes out there, so I asked Kay to narrow the field down. Here's her reply: "I was looking for a recipe for the shrimp to be the main ingredient. I prefer something with garlic and butter. I would like the shrimp to be oven baked or oven roasted. The shrimp I would like to serve over rice. I also would like to use frozen shrimp. I do realize it needs to be defrosted."

Could you broil the shrimp, Kay? If so, I'd go right for this scampi dish from Pierre Franey, which was featured in his 1979 book, "The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet." This recipe has long provided me with a framework when I've wanted a simple, garlicky shrimp dish to spoon over rice. I'd adjust the quantity of ingredients, throw some butter in with the olive oil, skip the parsley, use hot sauce instead of red pepper flakes, but the basic cooking instructions and timing stayed steady. You could bake it too, but remember the shrimp will take longer to cook — and long cooking can kill them, turning the shrimp dry and leathery. So keep basting the shrimp with the pan liquids to keep them moist.


Classic shrimp recipes: Scampi and de Jonghe

Q: Just wondering if you have any baked shrimp recipes or recipes that featured baked shrimp?

—Kay Daniels, Downers Grove

A: There are a number of baked shrimp recipes out there, so I asked Kay to narrow the field down. Here's her reply: "I was looking for a recipe for the shrimp to be the main ingredient. I prefer something with garlic and butter. I would like the shrimp to be oven baked or oven roasted. The shrimp I would like to serve over rice. I also would like to use frozen shrimp. I do realize it needs to be defrosted."

Could you broil the shrimp, Kay? If so, I'd go right for this scampi dish from Pierre Franey, which was featured in his 1979 book, "The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet." This recipe has long provided me with a framework when I've wanted a simple, garlicky shrimp dish to spoon over rice. I'd adjust the quantity of ingredients, throw some butter in with the olive oil, skip the parsley, use hot sauce instead of red pepper flakes, but the basic cooking instructions and timing stayed steady. You could bake it too, but remember the shrimp will take longer to cook — and long cooking can kill them, turning the shrimp dry and leathery. So keep basting the shrimp with the pan liquids to keep them moist.


Classic shrimp recipes: Scampi and de Jonghe

Q: Just wondering if you have any baked shrimp recipes or recipes that featured baked shrimp?

—Kay Daniels, Downers Grove

A: There are a number of baked shrimp recipes out there, so I asked Kay to narrow the field down. Here's her reply: "I was looking for a recipe for the shrimp to be the main ingredient. I prefer something with garlic and butter. I would like the shrimp to be oven baked or oven roasted. The shrimp I would like to serve over rice. I also would like to use frozen shrimp. I do realize it needs to be defrosted."

Could you broil the shrimp, Kay? If so, I'd go right for this scampi dish from Pierre Franey, which was featured in his 1979 book, "The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet." This recipe has long provided me with a framework when I've wanted a simple, garlicky shrimp dish to spoon over rice. I'd adjust the quantity of ingredients, throw some butter in with the olive oil, skip the parsley, use hot sauce instead of red pepper flakes, but the basic cooking instructions and timing stayed steady. You could bake it too, but remember the shrimp will take longer to cook — and long cooking can kill them, turning the shrimp dry and leathery. So keep basting the shrimp with the pan liquids to keep them moist.


Classic shrimp recipes: Scampi and de Jonghe

Q: Just wondering if you have any baked shrimp recipes or recipes that featured baked shrimp?

—Kay Daniels, Downers Grove

A: There are a number of baked shrimp recipes out there, so I asked Kay to narrow the field down. Here's her reply: "I was looking for a recipe for the shrimp to be the main ingredient. I prefer something with garlic and butter. I would like the shrimp to be oven baked or oven roasted. The shrimp I would like to serve over rice. I also would like to use frozen shrimp. I do realize it needs to be defrosted."

Could you broil the shrimp, Kay? If so, I'd go right for this scampi dish from Pierre Franey, which was featured in his 1979 book, "The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet." This recipe has long provided me with a framework when I've wanted a simple, garlicky shrimp dish to spoon over rice. I'd adjust the quantity of ingredients, throw some butter in with the olive oil, skip the parsley, use hot sauce instead of red pepper flakes, but the basic cooking instructions and timing stayed steady. You could bake it too, but remember the shrimp will take longer to cook — and long cooking can kill them, turning the shrimp dry and leathery. So keep basting the shrimp with the pan liquids to keep them moist.


Classic shrimp recipes: Scampi and de Jonghe

Q: Just wondering if you have any baked shrimp recipes or recipes that featured baked shrimp?

—Kay Daniels, Downers Grove

A: There are a number of baked shrimp recipes out there, so I asked Kay to narrow the field down. Here's her reply: "I was looking for a recipe for the shrimp to be the main ingredient. I prefer something with garlic and butter. I would like the shrimp to be oven baked or oven roasted. The shrimp I would like to serve over rice. I also would like to use frozen shrimp. I do realize it needs to be defrosted."

Could you broil the shrimp, Kay? If so, I'd go right for this scampi dish from Pierre Franey, which was featured in his 1979 book, "The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet." This recipe has long provided me with a framework when I've wanted a simple, garlicky shrimp dish to spoon over rice. I'd adjust the quantity of ingredients, throw some butter in with the olive oil, skip the parsley, use hot sauce instead of red pepper flakes, but the basic cooking instructions and timing stayed steady. You could bake it too, but remember the shrimp will take longer to cook — and long cooking can kill them, turning the shrimp dry and leathery. So keep basting the shrimp with the pan liquids to keep them moist.


Classic shrimp recipes: Scampi and de Jonghe

Q: Just wondering if you have any baked shrimp recipes or recipes that featured baked shrimp?

—Kay Daniels, Downers Grove

A: There are a number of baked shrimp recipes out there, so I asked Kay to narrow the field down. Here's her reply: "I was looking for a recipe for the shrimp to be the main ingredient. I prefer something with garlic and butter. I would like the shrimp to be oven baked or oven roasted. The shrimp I would like to serve over rice. I also would like to use frozen shrimp. I do realize it needs to be defrosted."

Could you broil the shrimp, Kay? If so, I'd go right for this scampi dish from Pierre Franey, which was featured in his 1979 book, "The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet." This recipe has long provided me with a framework when I've wanted a simple, garlicky shrimp dish to spoon over rice. I'd adjust the quantity of ingredients, throw some butter in with the olive oil, skip the parsley, use hot sauce instead of red pepper flakes, but the basic cooking instructions and timing stayed steady. You could bake it too, but remember the shrimp will take longer to cook — and long cooking can kill them, turning the shrimp dry and leathery. So keep basting the shrimp with the pan liquids to keep them moist.


Classic shrimp recipes: Scampi and de Jonghe

Q: Just wondering if you have any baked shrimp recipes or recipes that featured baked shrimp?

—Kay Daniels, Downers Grove

A: There are a number of baked shrimp recipes out there, so I asked Kay to narrow the field down. Here's her reply: "I was looking for a recipe for the shrimp to be the main ingredient. I prefer something with garlic and butter. I would like the shrimp to be oven baked or oven roasted. The shrimp I would like to serve over rice. I also would like to use frozen shrimp. I do realize it needs to be defrosted."

Could you broil the shrimp, Kay? If so, I'd go right for this scampi dish from Pierre Franey, which was featured in his 1979 book, "The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet." This recipe has long provided me with a framework when I've wanted a simple, garlicky shrimp dish to spoon over rice. I'd adjust the quantity of ingredients, throw some butter in with the olive oil, skip the parsley, use hot sauce instead of red pepper flakes, but the basic cooking instructions and timing stayed steady. You could bake it too, but remember the shrimp will take longer to cook — and long cooking can kill them, turning the shrimp dry and leathery. So keep basting the shrimp with the pan liquids to keep them moist.


Classic shrimp recipes: Scampi and de Jonghe

Q: Just wondering if you have any baked shrimp recipes or recipes that featured baked shrimp?

—Kay Daniels, Downers Grove

A: There are a number of baked shrimp recipes out there, so I asked Kay to narrow the field down. Here's her reply: "I was looking for a recipe for the shrimp to be the main ingredient. I prefer something with garlic and butter. I would like the shrimp to be oven baked or oven roasted. The shrimp I would like to serve over rice. I also would like to use frozen shrimp. I do realize it needs to be defrosted."

Could you broil the shrimp, Kay? If so, I'd go right for this scampi dish from Pierre Franey, which was featured in his 1979 book, "The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet." This recipe has long provided me with a framework when I've wanted a simple, garlicky shrimp dish to spoon over rice. I'd adjust the quantity of ingredients, throw some butter in with the olive oil, skip the parsley, use hot sauce instead of red pepper flakes, but the basic cooking instructions and timing stayed steady. You could bake it too, but remember the shrimp will take longer to cook — and long cooking can kill them, turning the shrimp dry and leathery. So keep basting the shrimp with the pan liquids to keep them moist.


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