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The Unhealthiest Turkey Sandwiches at Chain Restaurants

The Unhealthiest Turkey Sandwiches at Chain Restaurants


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Although turkey is a staple of any healthy eating plan, many chains load their sandwiches with highly caloric toppings and sauce

Many chain restaurant items contain more than the daily recommended amounts of calories and sodium.

If you’re looking to lose weight, a good first step is to evaluate your diet and figure out which area needs the most improvement. Are you a late night snacker? Do you have an insatiable sweet tooth? Do you skip breakfast in the morning? Though these habits may seem trivial, they could be the difference between losing weight and holding onto those extra pounds.

Click here for the Unhealthiest Turkey Sandwiches at Chain Restaurants slideshow.

For many people, lunchtime poses the biggest problem. We often find ourselves pressed for time, with few options but to grab something from a chain restaurant. This can make choosing healthy foods difficult, especially at chains that are notorious for serving sodium-laden, highly caloric options. Fortunately, with a little research, you can easily find a healthy option for your on-the-go lunch.

Grilled or roasted turkey breast is a staple of any balanced healthy eating plan. Turkey breast is high in iron and low in fat, as long as you choose skinless, white meat. It’s also high in protein, which will help you stay full and fueled until dinnertime. Generally speaking, a turkey sandwich is a great go-to for lunchtime. However, you have to be wary of the other ingredients included in your sandwich. With the addition of toppings like mayonnaise, bacon, and cheese, a turkey sandwich can quickly turn into an unhealthy option.

To help you avoid these pitfalls in your favorite chain restaurant menus, we’ve compiled a list of the 10 unhealthiest turkey sandwiches. The following sandwiches are high in calories and contain staggering amounts of sodium, fat, and cholesterol. Try to steer clear of these 10 sandwiches the next time you grab lunch at a chain.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.