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The Band Chicago’s Logo Is Based on Coca Cola’s

The Band Chicago’s Logo Is Based on Coca Cola’s


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If the term surf city conjures up images of 1960s California beach fun to you, there’s a reason why: Jan & Dean. As contemporaries of The Beach Boys, Jan & Dean were instrumental in the creation of the California pop sound. Hits like “Dead Man’s Curve,” “The Little Old Lady From Pasadena,” and the aforementioned “Surf City” remain radio staples today.

These days, Dean Torrence continues to sing with the Surf City All-Stars, but he works on a variety of other projects. His trademark “Surf City” led to his participation in Ruby’s Surf City Diner, a restaurant in Huntington Beach, California, where he’s also the spokesperson. Torrence has also been an in-demand graphic designer for decades and helped create logos and/or album covers for The Beach Boys, Steve Martin, Harry Nilsson, The Ventures, Linda Ronstadt, and Diana Ross. As it turns out, soft drinks played a role in the creation of some of that artwork.

While speaking to Torrence about the new Jan & Dean release for Omnivore Recordings, Filet Of Sole Redux: The Rejected Master Recordings, the opportunity to ask a few Daily Meal-related questions came up.

On his restaurant Ruby’s Surf City Diner:
Ruby’s Diners have been around for 25, 30 years and they became experts on putting restaurants on piers. They came to Huntington Beach about 20 years ago, and I was on the marketing board [of Huntington Beach] at the time and they wanted to use the Surf City trademark and incorporate with Ruby’s. So they were going to call it Ruby’s Surf City Diner instead of just Ruby’s Diner. We incorporate some Surf City stuff. We’ll have a neon sign up on the roof that can be read by people flying over in commercial airlines, which is pretty cool.

[The restaurant’s owner has] never had liquor, but he’s thinking about having a tiki bar on the second floor, which has a beautiful ocean view, right out over the ocean. So this is kind of the mecca of surfing and here is this restaurant. It is still right over the water, the people are catching the best waves. It is just perfect.

On how branding and food has played into his career:
Consciously or subconsciously, people are usually drawn to a brand if it is working, like Nike’s logo. I always loved Coca-Cola; I mean I love the Coca-Cola logo. Long story short, James Guercio and I got together doing Chicago [design] things because he kind of became their manager and he understood branding. We said, let’s make the Chicago logo look like our favorite Coca-Cola logo.

Then I applied the whole thing that we did with Chicago to the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. I formulated a logo for the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band that was based on Nesbitt, which was another soft drink logo. The “N” for Nitty Gritty Dirt Band came right from the Nesbitt logo.


Clothing Logos May Be Worth Saving

Soft-drink logos have been enormously popular with collectors over the years. Almost anything with the traditional Coca-Cola script-style of writing on it--trays, signs, bottle openers--is eagerly snapped up by Americana buffs at collector shows and flea markets.

Now it has dawned on such companies that logos, many of which already are household items, can be aggressively marketed on clothing lines. This translates into even more product recognition and profits.

And, for collectors, this means whole new fields are opening up. Today’s logo-laden clothing will surely turn into tomorrow’s collectibles.

About two years ago, Atlanta-based Coca-Cola licensed its logo to Murjani International Ltd. of New York, a clothing manufacturer and retailer that is making leisure clothes--rugby shirts, jeans, denim jackets, sweat shirts and the like--that either carry the familiar logo emblazoned on the clothing or, more subtly, just on the label where only the owner knows it’s there.

In Purchase, N.Y., headquarters of arch-competitor Pepsi-Cola Co., Ken Ross, a public relations official, says a similar licensing deal was cut last year with a Pennsylvania firm, VF Corp., which manufactures Lee jeans. Pepsi, he added, was not copying Coca Cola’s success, but, in fact, had been studying the marketing of its own clothing line “for a number of years.” According to Ross, Pepsi is initially aiming at marketing its leisure clothing through large department stores. Like the Coca-Cola logo, the familiar red, white and blue Pepsi label might be splashed across the clothing, subtly written in small letters on a pocket or hidden on a label.

For both firms, the clothing line is, of course, a natural way to increase the visibility of two soft-drink products that, arguably, are already the most recognizable in the world.

Other food and beverage firms have been monitoring the Coca-Cola and Pepsi gambits. For example, Pennsylvania-based Hershey Foods Corp., with its famous chocolate-bar logo, also got into the act last year with Hershey’s Clothes for Kids.

“Consumers are looking for that kind of thing,” Hershey public relations manager Carl Andrews says.

We could say the same thing about collectors.

Our recent travels took us to a bookstore tucked away in the old section of Santa Fe, N.M., where we ran across “Used and Rare Books, a Primer for Bookfinders,” by Betty and Riley Parker. The 14-page booklet ($1.50, New Mexico Book League, 8632 Horacio Place N.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87111) contains 14 book-collecting tips that might seem obvious to veteran collectors but that provide some quick guidance for collectors who are just getting started.

For example, we have received inquiries over the years from collectors who want to know if a book’s dust jacket enhances its value. According to the authors: “Dust jackets have become a prestigious part of the book in the last decade.

“For instance, a fine first edition of a modern novel, such as Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath,’ can sell for about six times more with a fine first-edition dust jacket than without one. It is increasingly important to keep the dust jacket even if you do not like it or want it.”

Ronald L. Soble cannot answer mail personally but will respond in this column to questions of general interest about collectibles. Do not telephone. Write to Your Collectibles, You section, The Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles 90053.


Clothing Logos May Be Worth Saving

Soft-drink logos have been enormously popular with collectors over the years. Almost anything with the traditional Coca-Cola script-style of writing on it--trays, signs, bottle openers--is eagerly snapped up by Americana buffs at collector shows and flea markets.

Now it has dawned on such companies that logos, many of which already are household items, can be aggressively marketed on clothing lines. This translates into even more product recognition and profits.

And, for collectors, this means whole new fields are opening up. Today’s logo-laden clothing will surely turn into tomorrow’s collectibles.

About two years ago, Atlanta-based Coca-Cola licensed its logo to Murjani International Ltd. of New York, a clothing manufacturer and retailer that is making leisure clothes--rugby shirts, jeans, denim jackets, sweat shirts and the like--that either carry the familiar logo emblazoned on the clothing or, more subtly, just on the label where only the owner knows it’s there.

In Purchase, N.Y., headquarters of arch-competitor Pepsi-Cola Co., Ken Ross, a public relations official, says a similar licensing deal was cut last year with a Pennsylvania firm, VF Corp., which manufactures Lee jeans. Pepsi, he added, was not copying Coca Cola’s success, but, in fact, had been studying the marketing of its own clothing line “for a number of years.” According to Ross, Pepsi is initially aiming at marketing its leisure clothing through large department stores. Like the Coca-Cola logo, the familiar red, white and blue Pepsi label might be splashed across the clothing, subtly written in small letters on a pocket or hidden on a label.

For both firms, the clothing line is, of course, a natural way to increase the visibility of two soft-drink products that, arguably, are already the most recognizable in the world.

Other food and beverage firms have been monitoring the Coca-Cola and Pepsi gambits. For example, Pennsylvania-based Hershey Foods Corp., with its famous chocolate-bar logo, also got into the act last year with Hershey’s Clothes for Kids.

“Consumers are looking for that kind of thing,” Hershey public relations manager Carl Andrews says.

We could say the same thing about collectors.

Our recent travels took us to a bookstore tucked away in the old section of Santa Fe, N.M., where we ran across “Used and Rare Books, a Primer for Bookfinders,” by Betty and Riley Parker. The 14-page booklet ($1.50, New Mexico Book League, 8632 Horacio Place N.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87111) contains 14 book-collecting tips that might seem obvious to veteran collectors but that provide some quick guidance for collectors who are just getting started.

For example, we have received inquiries over the years from collectors who want to know if a book’s dust jacket enhances its value. According to the authors: “Dust jackets have become a prestigious part of the book in the last decade.

“For instance, a fine first edition of a modern novel, such as Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath,’ can sell for about six times more with a fine first-edition dust jacket than without one. It is increasingly important to keep the dust jacket even if you do not like it or want it.”

Ronald L. Soble cannot answer mail personally but will respond in this column to questions of general interest about collectibles. Do not telephone. Write to Your Collectibles, You section, The Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles 90053.


Clothing Logos May Be Worth Saving

Soft-drink logos have been enormously popular with collectors over the years. Almost anything with the traditional Coca-Cola script-style of writing on it--trays, signs, bottle openers--is eagerly snapped up by Americana buffs at collector shows and flea markets.

Now it has dawned on such companies that logos, many of which already are household items, can be aggressively marketed on clothing lines. This translates into even more product recognition and profits.

And, for collectors, this means whole new fields are opening up. Today’s logo-laden clothing will surely turn into tomorrow’s collectibles.

About two years ago, Atlanta-based Coca-Cola licensed its logo to Murjani International Ltd. of New York, a clothing manufacturer and retailer that is making leisure clothes--rugby shirts, jeans, denim jackets, sweat shirts and the like--that either carry the familiar logo emblazoned on the clothing or, more subtly, just on the label where only the owner knows it’s there.

In Purchase, N.Y., headquarters of arch-competitor Pepsi-Cola Co., Ken Ross, a public relations official, says a similar licensing deal was cut last year with a Pennsylvania firm, VF Corp., which manufactures Lee jeans. Pepsi, he added, was not copying Coca Cola’s success, but, in fact, had been studying the marketing of its own clothing line “for a number of years.” According to Ross, Pepsi is initially aiming at marketing its leisure clothing through large department stores. Like the Coca-Cola logo, the familiar red, white and blue Pepsi label might be splashed across the clothing, subtly written in small letters on a pocket or hidden on a label.

For both firms, the clothing line is, of course, a natural way to increase the visibility of two soft-drink products that, arguably, are already the most recognizable in the world.

Other food and beverage firms have been monitoring the Coca-Cola and Pepsi gambits. For example, Pennsylvania-based Hershey Foods Corp., with its famous chocolate-bar logo, also got into the act last year with Hershey’s Clothes for Kids.

“Consumers are looking for that kind of thing,” Hershey public relations manager Carl Andrews says.

We could say the same thing about collectors.

Our recent travels took us to a bookstore tucked away in the old section of Santa Fe, N.M., where we ran across “Used and Rare Books, a Primer for Bookfinders,” by Betty and Riley Parker. The 14-page booklet ($1.50, New Mexico Book League, 8632 Horacio Place N.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87111) contains 14 book-collecting tips that might seem obvious to veteran collectors but that provide some quick guidance for collectors who are just getting started.

For example, we have received inquiries over the years from collectors who want to know if a book’s dust jacket enhances its value. According to the authors: “Dust jackets have become a prestigious part of the book in the last decade.

“For instance, a fine first edition of a modern novel, such as Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath,’ can sell for about six times more with a fine first-edition dust jacket than without one. It is increasingly important to keep the dust jacket even if you do not like it or want it.”

Ronald L. Soble cannot answer mail personally but will respond in this column to questions of general interest about collectibles. Do not telephone. Write to Your Collectibles, You section, The Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles 90053.


Clothing Logos May Be Worth Saving

Soft-drink logos have been enormously popular with collectors over the years. Almost anything with the traditional Coca-Cola script-style of writing on it--trays, signs, bottle openers--is eagerly snapped up by Americana buffs at collector shows and flea markets.

Now it has dawned on such companies that logos, many of which already are household items, can be aggressively marketed on clothing lines. This translates into even more product recognition and profits.

And, for collectors, this means whole new fields are opening up. Today’s logo-laden clothing will surely turn into tomorrow’s collectibles.

About two years ago, Atlanta-based Coca-Cola licensed its logo to Murjani International Ltd. of New York, a clothing manufacturer and retailer that is making leisure clothes--rugby shirts, jeans, denim jackets, sweat shirts and the like--that either carry the familiar logo emblazoned on the clothing or, more subtly, just on the label where only the owner knows it’s there.

In Purchase, N.Y., headquarters of arch-competitor Pepsi-Cola Co., Ken Ross, a public relations official, says a similar licensing deal was cut last year with a Pennsylvania firm, VF Corp., which manufactures Lee jeans. Pepsi, he added, was not copying Coca Cola’s success, but, in fact, had been studying the marketing of its own clothing line “for a number of years.” According to Ross, Pepsi is initially aiming at marketing its leisure clothing through large department stores. Like the Coca-Cola logo, the familiar red, white and blue Pepsi label might be splashed across the clothing, subtly written in small letters on a pocket or hidden on a label.

For both firms, the clothing line is, of course, a natural way to increase the visibility of two soft-drink products that, arguably, are already the most recognizable in the world.

Other food and beverage firms have been monitoring the Coca-Cola and Pepsi gambits. For example, Pennsylvania-based Hershey Foods Corp., with its famous chocolate-bar logo, also got into the act last year with Hershey’s Clothes for Kids.

“Consumers are looking for that kind of thing,” Hershey public relations manager Carl Andrews says.

We could say the same thing about collectors.

Our recent travels took us to a bookstore tucked away in the old section of Santa Fe, N.M., where we ran across “Used and Rare Books, a Primer for Bookfinders,” by Betty and Riley Parker. The 14-page booklet ($1.50, New Mexico Book League, 8632 Horacio Place N.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87111) contains 14 book-collecting tips that might seem obvious to veteran collectors but that provide some quick guidance for collectors who are just getting started.

For example, we have received inquiries over the years from collectors who want to know if a book’s dust jacket enhances its value. According to the authors: “Dust jackets have become a prestigious part of the book in the last decade.

“For instance, a fine first edition of a modern novel, such as Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath,’ can sell for about six times more with a fine first-edition dust jacket than without one. It is increasingly important to keep the dust jacket even if you do not like it or want it.”

Ronald L. Soble cannot answer mail personally but will respond in this column to questions of general interest about collectibles. Do not telephone. Write to Your Collectibles, You section, The Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles 90053.


Clothing Logos May Be Worth Saving

Soft-drink logos have been enormously popular with collectors over the years. Almost anything with the traditional Coca-Cola script-style of writing on it--trays, signs, bottle openers--is eagerly snapped up by Americana buffs at collector shows and flea markets.

Now it has dawned on such companies that logos, many of which already are household items, can be aggressively marketed on clothing lines. This translates into even more product recognition and profits.

And, for collectors, this means whole new fields are opening up. Today’s logo-laden clothing will surely turn into tomorrow’s collectibles.

About two years ago, Atlanta-based Coca-Cola licensed its logo to Murjani International Ltd. of New York, a clothing manufacturer and retailer that is making leisure clothes--rugby shirts, jeans, denim jackets, sweat shirts and the like--that either carry the familiar logo emblazoned on the clothing or, more subtly, just on the label where only the owner knows it’s there.

In Purchase, N.Y., headquarters of arch-competitor Pepsi-Cola Co., Ken Ross, a public relations official, says a similar licensing deal was cut last year with a Pennsylvania firm, VF Corp., which manufactures Lee jeans. Pepsi, he added, was not copying Coca Cola’s success, but, in fact, had been studying the marketing of its own clothing line “for a number of years.” According to Ross, Pepsi is initially aiming at marketing its leisure clothing through large department stores. Like the Coca-Cola logo, the familiar red, white and blue Pepsi label might be splashed across the clothing, subtly written in small letters on a pocket or hidden on a label.

For both firms, the clothing line is, of course, a natural way to increase the visibility of two soft-drink products that, arguably, are already the most recognizable in the world.

Other food and beverage firms have been monitoring the Coca-Cola and Pepsi gambits. For example, Pennsylvania-based Hershey Foods Corp., with its famous chocolate-bar logo, also got into the act last year with Hershey’s Clothes for Kids.

“Consumers are looking for that kind of thing,” Hershey public relations manager Carl Andrews says.

We could say the same thing about collectors.

Our recent travels took us to a bookstore tucked away in the old section of Santa Fe, N.M., where we ran across “Used and Rare Books, a Primer for Bookfinders,” by Betty and Riley Parker. The 14-page booklet ($1.50, New Mexico Book League, 8632 Horacio Place N.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87111) contains 14 book-collecting tips that might seem obvious to veteran collectors but that provide some quick guidance for collectors who are just getting started.

For example, we have received inquiries over the years from collectors who want to know if a book’s dust jacket enhances its value. According to the authors: “Dust jackets have become a prestigious part of the book in the last decade.

“For instance, a fine first edition of a modern novel, such as Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath,’ can sell for about six times more with a fine first-edition dust jacket than without one. It is increasingly important to keep the dust jacket even if you do not like it or want it.”

Ronald L. Soble cannot answer mail personally but will respond in this column to questions of general interest about collectibles. Do not telephone. Write to Your Collectibles, You section, The Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles 90053.


Clothing Logos May Be Worth Saving

Soft-drink logos have been enormously popular with collectors over the years. Almost anything with the traditional Coca-Cola script-style of writing on it--trays, signs, bottle openers--is eagerly snapped up by Americana buffs at collector shows and flea markets.

Now it has dawned on such companies that logos, many of which already are household items, can be aggressively marketed on clothing lines. This translates into even more product recognition and profits.

And, for collectors, this means whole new fields are opening up. Today’s logo-laden clothing will surely turn into tomorrow’s collectibles.

About two years ago, Atlanta-based Coca-Cola licensed its logo to Murjani International Ltd. of New York, a clothing manufacturer and retailer that is making leisure clothes--rugby shirts, jeans, denim jackets, sweat shirts and the like--that either carry the familiar logo emblazoned on the clothing or, more subtly, just on the label where only the owner knows it’s there.

In Purchase, N.Y., headquarters of arch-competitor Pepsi-Cola Co., Ken Ross, a public relations official, says a similar licensing deal was cut last year with a Pennsylvania firm, VF Corp., which manufactures Lee jeans. Pepsi, he added, was not copying Coca Cola’s success, but, in fact, had been studying the marketing of its own clothing line “for a number of years.” According to Ross, Pepsi is initially aiming at marketing its leisure clothing through large department stores. Like the Coca-Cola logo, the familiar red, white and blue Pepsi label might be splashed across the clothing, subtly written in small letters on a pocket or hidden on a label.

For both firms, the clothing line is, of course, a natural way to increase the visibility of two soft-drink products that, arguably, are already the most recognizable in the world.

Other food and beverage firms have been monitoring the Coca-Cola and Pepsi gambits. For example, Pennsylvania-based Hershey Foods Corp., with its famous chocolate-bar logo, also got into the act last year with Hershey’s Clothes for Kids.

“Consumers are looking for that kind of thing,” Hershey public relations manager Carl Andrews says.

We could say the same thing about collectors.

Our recent travels took us to a bookstore tucked away in the old section of Santa Fe, N.M., where we ran across “Used and Rare Books, a Primer for Bookfinders,” by Betty and Riley Parker. The 14-page booklet ($1.50, New Mexico Book League, 8632 Horacio Place N.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87111) contains 14 book-collecting tips that might seem obvious to veteran collectors but that provide some quick guidance for collectors who are just getting started.

For example, we have received inquiries over the years from collectors who want to know if a book’s dust jacket enhances its value. According to the authors: “Dust jackets have become a prestigious part of the book in the last decade.

“For instance, a fine first edition of a modern novel, such as Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath,’ can sell for about six times more with a fine first-edition dust jacket than without one. It is increasingly important to keep the dust jacket even if you do not like it or want it.”

Ronald L. Soble cannot answer mail personally but will respond in this column to questions of general interest about collectibles. Do not telephone. Write to Your Collectibles, You section, The Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles 90053.


Clothing Logos May Be Worth Saving

Soft-drink logos have been enormously popular with collectors over the years. Almost anything with the traditional Coca-Cola script-style of writing on it--trays, signs, bottle openers--is eagerly snapped up by Americana buffs at collector shows and flea markets.

Now it has dawned on such companies that logos, many of which already are household items, can be aggressively marketed on clothing lines. This translates into even more product recognition and profits.

And, for collectors, this means whole new fields are opening up. Today’s logo-laden clothing will surely turn into tomorrow’s collectibles.

About two years ago, Atlanta-based Coca-Cola licensed its logo to Murjani International Ltd. of New York, a clothing manufacturer and retailer that is making leisure clothes--rugby shirts, jeans, denim jackets, sweat shirts and the like--that either carry the familiar logo emblazoned on the clothing or, more subtly, just on the label where only the owner knows it’s there.

In Purchase, N.Y., headquarters of arch-competitor Pepsi-Cola Co., Ken Ross, a public relations official, says a similar licensing deal was cut last year with a Pennsylvania firm, VF Corp., which manufactures Lee jeans. Pepsi, he added, was not copying Coca Cola’s success, but, in fact, had been studying the marketing of its own clothing line “for a number of years.” According to Ross, Pepsi is initially aiming at marketing its leisure clothing through large department stores. Like the Coca-Cola logo, the familiar red, white and blue Pepsi label might be splashed across the clothing, subtly written in small letters on a pocket or hidden on a label.

For both firms, the clothing line is, of course, a natural way to increase the visibility of two soft-drink products that, arguably, are already the most recognizable in the world.

Other food and beverage firms have been monitoring the Coca-Cola and Pepsi gambits. For example, Pennsylvania-based Hershey Foods Corp., with its famous chocolate-bar logo, also got into the act last year with Hershey’s Clothes for Kids.

“Consumers are looking for that kind of thing,” Hershey public relations manager Carl Andrews says.

We could say the same thing about collectors.

Our recent travels took us to a bookstore tucked away in the old section of Santa Fe, N.M., where we ran across “Used and Rare Books, a Primer for Bookfinders,” by Betty and Riley Parker. The 14-page booklet ($1.50, New Mexico Book League, 8632 Horacio Place N.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87111) contains 14 book-collecting tips that might seem obvious to veteran collectors but that provide some quick guidance for collectors who are just getting started.

For example, we have received inquiries over the years from collectors who want to know if a book’s dust jacket enhances its value. According to the authors: “Dust jackets have become a prestigious part of the book in the last decade.

“For instance, a fine first edition of a modern novel, such as Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath,’ can sell for about six times more with a fine first-edition dust jacket than without one. It is increasingly important to keep the dust jacket even if you do not like it or want it.”

Ronald L. Soble cannot answer mail personally but will respond in this column to questions of general interest about collectibles. Do not telephone. Write to Your Collectibles, You section, The Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles 90053.


Clothing Logos May Be Worth Saving

Soft-drink logos have been enormously popular with collectors over the years. Almost anything with the traditional Coca-Cola script-style of writing on it--trays, signs, bottle openers--is eagerly snapped up by Americana buffs at collector shows and flea markets.

Now it has dawned on such companies that logos, many of which already are household items, can be aggressively marketed on clothing lines. This translates into even more product recognition and profits.

And, for collectors, this means whole new fields are opening up. Today’s logo-laden clothing will surely turn into tomorrow’s collectibles.

About two years ago, Atlanta-based Coca-Cola licensed its logo to Murjani International Ltd. of New York, a clothing manufacturer and retailer that is making leisure clothes--rugby shirts, jeans, denim jackets, sweat shirts and the like--that either carry the familiar logo emblazoned on the clothing or, more subtly, just on the label where only the owner knows it’s there.

In Purchase, N.Y., headquarters of arch-competitor Pepsi-Cola Co., Ken Ross, a public relations official, says a similar licensing deal was cut last year with a Pennsylvania firm, VF Corp., which manufactures Lee jeans. Pepsi, he added, was not copying Coca Cola’s success, but, in fact, had been studying the marketing of its own clothing line “for a number of years.” According to Ross, Pepsi is initially aiming at marketing its leisure clothing through large department stores. Like the Coca-Cola logo, the familiar red, white and blue Pepsi label might be splashed across the clothing, subtly written in small letters on a pocket or hidden on a label.

For both firms, the clothing line is, of course, a natural way to increase the visibility of two soft-drink products that, arguably, are already the most recognizable in the world.

Other food and beverage firms have been monitoring the Coca-Cola and Pepsi gambits. For example, Pennsylvania-based Hershey Foods Corp., with its famous chocolate-bar logo, also got into the act last year with Hershey’s Clothes for Kids.

“Consumers are looking for that kind of thing,” Hershey public relations manager Carl Andrews says.

We could say the same thing about collectors.

Our recent travels took us to a bookstore tucked away in the old section of Santa Fe, N.M., where we ran across “Used and Rare Books, a Primer for Bookfinders,” by Betty and Riley Parker. The 14-page booklet ($1.50, New Mexico Book League, 8632 Horacio Place N.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87111) contains 14 book-collecting tips that might seem obvious to veteran collectors but that provide some quick guidance for collectors who are just getting started.

For example, we have received inquiries over the years from collectors who want to know if a book’s dust jacket enhances its value. According to the authors: “Dust jackets have become a prestigious part of the book in the last decade.

“For instance, a fine first edition of a modern novel, such as Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath,’ can sell for about six times more with a fine first-edition dust jacket than without one. It is increasingly important to keep the dust jacket even if you do not like it or want it.”

Ronald L. Soble cannot answer mail personally but will respond in this column to questions of general interest about collectibles. Do not telephone. Write to Your Collectibles, You section, The Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles 90053.


Clothing Logos May Be Worth Saving

Soft-drink logos have been enormously popular with collectors over the years. Almost anything with the traditional Coca-Cola script-style of writing on it--trays, signs, bottle openers--is eagerly snapped up by Americana buffs at collector shows and flea markets.

Now it has dawned on such companies that logos, many of which already are household items, can be aggressively marketed on clothing lines. This translates into even more product recognition and profits.

And, for collectors, this means whole new fields are opening up. Today’s logo-laden clothing will surely turn into tomorrow’s collectibles.

About two years ago, Atlanta-based Coca-Cola licensed its logo to Murjani International Ltd. of New York, a clothing manufacturer and retailer that is making leisure clothes--rugby shirts, jeans, denim jackets, sweat shirts and the like--that either carry the familiar logo emblazoned on the clothing or, more subtly, just on the label where only the owner knows it’s there.

In Purchase, N.Y., headquarters of arch-competitor Pepsi-Cola Co., Ken Ross, a public relations official, says a similar licensing deal was cut last year with a Pennsylvania firm, VF Corp., which manufactures Lee jeans. Pepsi, he added, was not copying Coca Cola’s success, but, in fact, had been studying the marketing of its own clothing line “for a number of years.” According to Ross, Pepsi is initially aiming at marketing its leisure clothing through large department stores. Like the Coca-Cola logo, the familiar red, white and blue Pepsi label might be splashed across the clothing, subtly written in small letters on a pocket or hidden on a label.

For both firms, the clothing line is, of course, a natural way to increase the visibility of two soft-drink products that, arguably, are already the most recognizable in the world.

Other food and beverage firms have been monitoring the Coca-Cola and Pepsi gambits. For example, Pennsylvania-based Hershey Foods Corp., with its famous chocolate-bar logo, also got into the act last year with Hershey’s Clothes for Kids.

“Consumers are looking for that kind of thing,” Hershey public relations manager Carl Andrews says.

We could say the same thing about collectors.

Our recent travels took us to a bookstore tucked away in the old section of Santa Fe, N.M., where we ran across “Used and Rare Books, a Primer for Bookfinders,” by Betty and Riley Parker. The 14-page booklet ($1.50, New Mexico Book League, 8632 Horacio Place N.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87111) contains 14 book-collecting tips that might seem obvious to veteran collectors but that provide some quick guidance for collectors who are just getting started.

For example, we have received inquiries over the years from collectors who want to know if a book’s dust jacket enhances its value. According to the authors: “Dust jackets have become a prestigious part of the book in the last decade.

“For instance, a fine first edition of a modern novel, such as Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath,’ can sell for about six times more with a fine first-edition dust jacket than without one. It is increasingly important to keep the dust jacket even if you do not like it or want it.”

Ronald L. Soble cannot answer mail personally but will respond in this column to questions of general interest about collectibles. Do not telephone. Write to Your Collectibles, You section, The Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles 90053.


Clothing Logos May Be Worth Saving

Soft-drink logos have been enormously popular with collectors over the years. Almost anything with the traditional Coca-Cola script-style of writing on it--trays, signs, bottle openers--is eagerly snapped up by Americana buffs at collector shows and flea markets.

Now it has dawned on such companies that logos, many of which already are household items, can be aggressively marketed on clothing lines. This translates into even more product recognition and profits.

And, for collectors, this means whole new fields are opening up. Today’s logo-laden clothing will surely turn into tomorrow’s collectibles.

About two years ago, Atlanta-based Coca-Cola licensed its logo to Murjani International Ltd. of New York, a clothing manufacturer and retailer that is making leisure clothes--rugby shirts, jeans, denim jackets, sweat shirts and the like--that either carry the familiar logo emblazoned on the clothing or, more subtly, just on the label where only the owner knows it’s there.

In Purchase, N.Y., headquarters of arch-competitor Pepsi-Cola Co., Ken Ross, a public relations official, says a similar licensing deal was cut last year with a Pennsylvania firm, VF Corp., which manufactures Lee jeans. Pepsi, he added, was not copying Coca Cola’s success, but, in fact, had been studying the marketing of its own clothing line “for a number of years.” According to Ross, Pepsi is initially aiming at marketing its leisure clothing through large department stores. Like the Coca-Cola logo, the familiar red, white and blue Pepsi label might be splashed across the clothing, subtly written in small letters on a pocket or hidden on a label.

For both firms, the clothing line is, of course, a natural way to increase the visibility of two soft-drink products that, arguably, are already the most recognizable in the world.

Other food and beverage firms have been monitoring the Coca-Cola and Pepsi gambits. For example, Pennsylvania-based Hershey Foods Corp., with its famous chocolate-bar logo, also got into the act last year with Hershey’s Clothes for Kids.

“Consumers are looking for that kind of thing,” Hershey public relations manager Carl Andrews says.

We could say the same thing about collectors.

Our recent travels took us to a bookstore tucked away in the old section of Santa Fe, N.M., where we ran across “Used and Rare Books, a Primer for Bookfinders,” by Betty and Riley Parker. The 14-page booklet ($1.50, New Mexico Book League, 8632 Horacio Place N.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87111) contains 14 book-collecting tips that might seem obvious to veteran collectors but that provide some quick guidance for collectors who are just getting started.

For example, we have received inquiries over the years from collectors who want to know if a book’s dust jacket enhances its value. According to the authors: “Dust jackets have become a prestigious part of the book in the last decade.

“For instance, a fine first edition of a modern novel, such as Steinbeck’s ‘Grapes of Wrath,’ can sell for about six times more with a fine first-edition dust jacket than without one. It is increasingly important to keep the dust jacket even if you do not like it or want it.”

Ronald L. Soble cannot answer mail personally but will respond in this column to questions of general interest about collectibles. Do not telephone. Write to Your Collectibles, You section, The Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles 90053.


Watch the video: Igor Butmans Band at the Dizzys Club Coca-Cola July 19th, 2012 (June 2022).