Other

Boxed.com Buys Fresh Produce from Costco, Marks It Up for Delivery

Boxed.com Buys Fresh Produce from Costco, Marks It Up for Delivery


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Boxed has been described as Costco for Millennials, and it’s buying from the real Costco

Wikimedia/Nandaro

Boxed.com has been described as Costco for Millennials, but it is actually buying produce from Costco and reselling it at a markup.

Boxed is an online and mobile-based seller of low-priced bulk products for delivery. It has been described as “Costco for Millennials,” and it even offers free samples like Costco does. But it turns out Boxed isn’t exactly a Costco rival, because Boxed is actually buying Costco produce, marking it up, and reselling it for delivery.


For four years now, Boxed has been selling huge quantities of things like paper towels, coffee pods, and laundry detergent. Now, according to The New York Post, Boxed is looking to start selling fresh produce, too, and it’s getting that produce and other fresh food from Costco.

The fresh food sales have started in New York City, Atlanta, Boston, and parts of New Jersey. Food can be delivered in just a few hours, and delivery is free on orders over $49.

Because Boxed is selling food from Costco at a markup, the prices are more expensive than if a person just drove to Costco in the first place. But ordering through the app means someone else does the actual footwork. For people in big cities who don’t want to have to carry 10 heads of lettuce on the bus, the convenience might be worth the markup.

“We always want to make sure our merchandise is cheaper, but in this case shoppers are paying for convenience,” Boxed spokesperson Ashish Prashar told the New York Post.

Boxed prices are about 8 percent higher than Costco’s, but still reportedly about 15 percent less than Fresh Direct.

This is not the first time Boxed and Costco have been linked like this. Back in 2014, when Boxed was still very new, GeekWire reported that Boxed was buying Costco products and reselling them at a markup, with Costco’s knowledge and cooperation.

Boxed is reportedly looking to expand its fresh food delivery service in the near future, possibly in Dallas or Las Vegas. Really, any city with a Costco could be a good option.

Check out 15 secrets of the $4.99 Costco rotisserie chicken.


Don't buy these 8 foods at Costco, experts say

Costco can be a great place to find good deals on the foods you eat every day. But there are a few areas where your local grocery store or a big box store like Walmart and Target can offer better value for your money.

That's especially true when it comes to size. Because Costco generally sells products in bulk, to get the most out of your purchase, you need to make sure you can consume the larger quantities of a product before it goes bad. For ordinary families or individuals, that can be a high bar to clear.

That's primarily why Charlene Haugsven, founder of MyFrugalAdventures.com, tells CNBC Make It, "Just because Costco has it doesn't mean it's a bargain."

Here are the eight types of groceries she and other experts suggest that the average shopper should think twice before buying in bulk at Costco:

  • Breakfast cereal
  • Ground coffee
  • Condiments and sauces, such as soy sauce
  • Flour
  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Spices

If you compare these items, especially the Kirkland brand, to similar products youɽ find at the grocery store simply on price, Costco usually wins. However, the reason grocery experts put these items in the "don't buy" category comes down to the size.

The containers or packages are simply too big to end up being a good value for the average person.

Sure, some folks with big families, an extra freezer or lots of pantry space may think these are a good deal. In many cases, though, you'll end up throwing a good portion of the food away or struggle to find room for it in your home.

"A normal family is just never going to get through the quantity you have to purchase," Haugsven says. That's especially true on items like soy sauce, spice mixes and produce. If you live by yourself, springing for Costco's 1-pound container of fresh spinach, for example, may not make sense, though it is a steal at $4.99. That's because, even if it's stored properly, fresh spinach will usually only last 5 to 7 days in the refrigerator, according to shelf-life guide site StillTasty.com.

Large quantities can also be unwieldy to store. Though grocery stores usually sell flour in 5-pound sacks, Costco sells it in 25-pound packages, and it can be difficult to find space for all of that. "I would never want to store 25 pounds of flour. That's a whole year's worth of flour in advance," Haugsven says.


Don't buy these 8 foods at Costco, experts say

Costco can be a great place to find good deals on the foods you eat every day. But there are a few areas where your local grocery store or a big box store like Walmart and Target can offer better value for your money.

That's especially true when it comes to size. Because Costco generally sells products in bulk, to get the most out of your purchase, you need to make sure you can consume the larger quantities of a product before it goes bad. For ordinary families or individuals, that can be a high bar to clear.

That's primarily why Charlene Haugsven, founder of MyFrugalAdventures.com, tells CNBC Make It, "Just because Costco has it doesn't mean it's a bargain."

Here are the eight types of groceries she and other experts suggest that the average shopper should think twice before buying in bulk at Costco:

  • Breakfast cereal
  • Ground coffee
  • Condiments and sauces, such as soy sauce
  • Flour
  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Spices

If you compare these items, especially the Kirkland brand, to similar products youɽ find at the grocery store simply on price, Costco usually wins. However, the reason grocery experts put these items in the "don't buy" category comes down to the size.

The containers or packages are simply too big to end up being a good value for the average person.

Sure, some folks with big families, an extra freezer or lots of pantry space may think these are a good deal. In many cases, though, you'll end up throwing a good portion of the food away or struggle to find room for it in your home.

"A normal family is just never going to get through the quantity you have to purchase," Haugsven says. That's especially true on items like soy sauce, spice mixes and produce. If you live by yourself, springing for Costco's 1-pound container of fresh spinach, for example, may not make sense, though it is a steal at $4.99. That's because, even if it's stored properly, fresh spinach will usually only last 5 to 7 days in the refrigerator, according to shelf-life guide site StillTasty.com.

Large quantities can also be unwieldy to store. Though grocery stores usually sell flour in 5-pound sacks, Costco sells it in 25-pound packages, and it can be difficult to find space for all of that. "I would never want to store 25 pounds of flour. That's a whole year's worth of flour in advance," Haugsven says.


Don't buy these 8 foods at Costco, experts say

Costco can be a great place to find good deals on the foods you eat every day. But there are a few areas where your local grocery store or a big box store like Walmart and Target can offer better value for your money.

That's especially true when it comes to size. Because Costco generally sells products in bulk, to get the most out of your purchase, you need to make sure you can consume the larger quantities of a product before it goes bad. For ordinary families or individuals, that can be a high bar to clear.

That's primarily why Charlene Haugsven, founder of MyFrugalAdventures.com, tells CNBC Make It, "Just because Costco has it doesn't mean it's a bargain."

Here are the eight types of groceries she and other experts suggest that the average shopper should think twice before buying in bulk at Costco:

  • Breakfast cereal
  • Ground coffee
  • Condiments and sauces, such as soy sauce
  • Flour
  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Spices

If you compare these items, especially the Kirkland brand, to similar products youɽ find at the grocery store simply on price, Costco usually wins. However, the reason grocery experts put these items in the "don't buy" category comes down to the size.

The containers or packages are simply too big to end up being a good value for the average person.

Sure, some folks with big families, an extra freezer or lots of pantry space may think these are a good deal. In many cases, though, you'll end up throwing a good portion of the food away or struggle to find room for it in your home.

"A normal family is just never going to get through the quantity you have to purchase," Haugsven says. That's especially true on items like soy sauce, spice mixes and produce. If you live by yourself, springing for Costco's 1-pound container of fresh spinach, for example, may not make sense, though it is a steal at $4.99. That's because, even if it's stored properly, fresh spinach will usually only last 5 to 7 days in the refrigerator, according to shelf-life guide site StillTasty.com.

Large quantities can also be unwieldy to store. Though grocery stores usually sell flour in 5-pound sacks, Costco sells it in 25-pound packages, and it can be difficult to find space for all of that. "I would never want to store 25 pounds of flour. That's a whole year's worth of flour in advance," Haugsven says.


Don't buy these 8 foods at Costco, experts say

Costco can be a great place to find good deals on the foods you eat every day. But there are a few areas where your local grocery store or a big box store like Walmart and Target can offer better value for your money.

That's especially true when it comes to size. Because Costco generally sells products in bulk, to get the most out of your purchase, you need to make sure you can consume the larger quantities of a product before it goes bad. For ordinary families or individuals, that can be a high bar to clear.

That's primarily why Charlene Haugsven, founder of MyFrugalAdventures.com, tells CNBC Make It, "Just because Costco has it doesn't mean it's a bargain."

Here are the eight types of groceries she and other experts suggest that the average shopper should think twice before buying in bulk at Costco:

  • Breakfast cereal
  • Ground coffee
  • Condiments and sauces, such as soy sauce
  • Flour
  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Spices

If you compare these items, especially the Kirkland brand, to similar products youɽ find at the grocery store simply on price, Costco usually wins. However, the reason grocery experts put these items in the "don't buy" category comes down to the size.

The containers or packages are simply too big to end up being a good value for the average person.

Sure, some folks with big families, an extra freezer or lots of pantry space may think these are a good deal. In many cases, though, you'll end up throwing a good portion of the food away or struggle to find room for it in your home.

"A normal family is just never going to get through the quantity you have to purchase," Haugsven says. That's especially true on items like soy sauce, spice mixes and produce. If you live by yourself, springing for Costco's 1-pound container of fresh spinach, for example, may not make sense, though it is a steal at $4.99. That's because, even if it's stored properly, fresh spinach will usually only last 5 to 7 days in the refrigerator, according to shelf-life guide site StillTasty.com.

Large quantities can also be unwieldy to store. Though grocery stores usually sell flour in 5-pound sacks, Costco sells it in 25-pound packages, and it can be difficult to find space for all of that. "I would never want to store 25 pounds of flour. That's a whole year's worth of flour in advance," Haugsven says.


Don't buy these 8 foods at Costco, experts say

Costco can be a great place to find good deals on the foods you eat every day. But there are a few areas where your local grocery store or a big box store like Walmart and Target can offer better value for your money.

That's especially true when it comes to size. Because Costco generally sells products in bulk, to get the most out of your purchase, you need to make sure you can consume the larger quantities of a product before it goes bad. For ordinary families or individuals, that can be a high bar to clear.

That's primarily why Charlene Haugsven, founder of MyFrugalAdventures.com, tells CNBC Make It, "Just because Costco has it doesn't mean it's a bargain."

Here are the eight types of groceries she and other experts suggest that the average shopper should think twice before buying in bulk at Costco:

  • Breakfast cereal
  • Ground coffee
  • Condiments and sauces, such as soy sauce
  • Flour
  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Spices

If you compare these items, especially the Kirkland brand, to similar products youɽ find at the grocery store simply on price, Costco usually wins. However, the reason grocery experts put these items in the "don't buy" category comes down to the size.

The containers or packages are simply too big to end up being a good value for the average person.

Sure, some folks with big families, an extra freezer or lots of pantry space may think these are a good deal. In many cases, though, you'll end up throwing a good portion of the food away or struggle to find room for it in your home.

"A normal family is just never going to get through the quantity you have to purchase," Haugsven says. That's especially true on items like soy sauce, spice mixes and produce. If you live by yourself, springing for Costco's 1-pound container of fresh spinach, for example, may not make sense, though it is a steal at $4.99. That's because, even if it's stored properly, fresh spinach will usually only last 5 to 7 days in the refrigerator, according to shelf-life guide site StillTasty.com.

Large quantities can also be unwieldy to store. Though grocery stores usually sell flour in 5-pound sacks, Costco sells it in 25-pound packages, and it can be difficult to find space for all of that. "I would never want to store 25 pounds of flour. That's a whole year's worth of flour in advance," Haugsven says.


Don't buy these 8 foods at Costco, experts say

Costco can be a great place to find good deals on the foods you eat every day. But there are a few areas where your local grocery store or a big box store like Walmart and Target can offer better value for your money.

That's especially true when it comes to size. Because Costco generally sells products in bulk, to get the most out of your purchase, you need to make sure you can consume the larger quantities of a product before it goes bad. For ordinary families or individuals, that can be a high bar to clear.

That's primarily why Charlene Haugsven, founder of MyFrugalAdventures.com, tells CNBC Make It, "Just because Costco has it doesn't mean it's a bargain."

Here are the eight types of groceries she and other experts suggest that the average shopper should think twice before buying in bulk at Costco:

  • Breakfast cereal
  • Ground coffee
  • Condiments and sauces, such as soy sauce
  • Flour
  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Spices

If you compare these items, especially the Kirkland brand, to similar products youɽ find at the grocery store simply on price, Costco usually wins. However, the reason grocery experts put these items in the "don't buy" category comes down to the size.

The containers or packages are simply too big to end up being a good value for the average person.

Sure, some folks with big families, an extra freezer or lots of pantry space may think these are a good deal. In many cases, though, you'll end up throwing a good portion of the food away or struggle to find room for it in your home.

"A normal family is just never going to get through the quantity you have to purchase," Haugsven says. That's especially true on items like soy sauce, spice mixes and produce. If you live by yourself, springing for Costco's 1-pound container of fresh spinach, for example, may not make sense, though it is a steal at $4.99. That's because, even if it's stored properly, fresh spinach will usually only last 5 to 7 days in the refrigerator, according to shelf-life guide site StillTasty.com.

Large quantities can also be unwieldy to store. Though grocery stores usually sell flour in 5-pound sacks, Costco sells it in 25-pound packages, and it can be difficult to find space for all of that. "I would never want to store 25 pounds of flour. That's a whole year's worth of flour in advance," Haugsven says.


Don't buy these 8 foods at Costco, experts say

Costco can be a great place to find good deals on the foods you eat every day. But there are a few areas where your local grocery store or a big box store like Walmart and Target can offer better value for your money.

That's especially true when it comes to size. Because Costco generally sells products in bulk, to get the most out of your purchase, you need to make sure you can consume the larger quantities of a product before it goes bad. For ordinary families or individuals, that can be a high bar to clear.

That's primarily why Charlene Haugsven, founder of MyFrugalAdventures.com, tells CNBC Make It, "Just because Costco has it doesn't mean it's a bargain."

Here are the eight types of groceries she and other experts suggest that the average shopper should think twice before buying in bulk at Costco:

  • Breakfast cereal
  • Ground coffee
  • Condiments and sauces, such as soy sauce
  • Flour
  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Spices

If you compare these items, especially the Kirkland brand, to similar products youɽ find at the grocery store simply on price, Costco usually wins. However, the reason grocery experts put these items in the "don't buy" category comes down to the size.

The containers or packages are simply too big to end up being a good value for the average person.

Sure, some folks with big families, an extra freezer or lots of pantry space may think these are a good deal. In many cases, though, you'll end up throwing a good portion of the food away or struggle to find room for it in your home.

"A normal family is just never going to get through the quantity you have to purchase," Haugsven says. That's especially true on items like soy sauce, spice mixes and produce. If you live by yourself, springing for Costco's 1-pound container of fresh spinach, for example, may not make sense, though it is a steal at $4.99. That's because, even if it's stored properly, fresh spinach will usually only last 5 to 7 days in the refrigerator, according to shelf-life guide site StillTasty.com.

Large quantities can also be unwieldy to store. Though grocery stores usually sell flour in 5-pound sacks, Costco sells it in 25-pound packages, and it can be difficult to find space for all of that. "I would never want to store 25 pounds of flour. That's a whole year's worth of flour in advance," Haugsven says.


Don't buy these 8 foods at Costco, experts say

Costco can be a great place to find good deals on the foods you eat every day. But there are a few areas where your local grocery store or a big box store like Walmart and Target can offer better value for your money.

That's especially true when it comes to size. Because Costco generally sells products in bulk, to get the most out of your purchase, you need to make sure you can consume the larger quantities of a product before it goes bad. For ordinary families or individuals, that can be a high bar to clear.

That's primarily why Charlene Haugsven, founder of MyFrugalAdventures.com, tells CNBC Make It, "Just because Costco has it doesn't mean it's a bargain."

Here are the eight types of groceries she and other experts suggest that the average shopper should think twice before buying in bulk at Costco:

  • Breakfast cereal
  • Ground coffee
  • Condiments and sauces, such as soy sauce
  • Flour
  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Spices

If you compare these items, especially the Kirkland brand, to similar products youɽ find at the grocery store simply on price, Costco usually wins. However, the reason grocery experts put these items in the "don't buy" category comes down to the size.

The containers or packages are simply too big to end up being a good value for the average person.

Sure, some folks with big families, an extra freezer or lots of pantry space may think these are a good deal. In many cases, though, you'll end up throwing a good portion of the food away or struggle to find room for it in your home.

"A normal family is just never going to get through the quantity you have to purchase," Haugsven says. That's especially true on items like soy sauce, spice mixes and produce. If you live by yourself, springing for Costco's 1-pound container of fresh spinach, for example, may not make sense, though it is a steal at $4.99. That's because, even if it's stored properly, fresh spinach will usually only last 5 to 7 days in the refrigerator, according to shelf-life guide site StillTasty.com.

Large quantities can also be unwieldy to store. Though grocery stores usually sell flour in 5-pound sacks, Costco sells it in 25-pound packages, and it can be difficult to find space for all of that. "I would never want to store 25 pounds of flour. That's a whole year's worth of flour in advance," Haugsven says.


Don't buy these 8 foods at Costco, experts say

Costco can be a great place to find good deals on the foods you eat every day. But there are a few areas where your local grocery store or a big box store like Walmart and Target can offer better value for your money.

That's especially true when it comes to size. Because Costco generally sells products in bulk, to get the most out of your purchase, you need to make sure you can consume the larger quantities of a product before it goes bad. For ordinary families or individuals, that can be a high bar to clear.

That's primarily why Charlene Haugsven, founder of MyFrugalAdventures.com, tells CNBC Make It, "Just because Costco has it doesn't mean it's a bargain."

Here are the eight types of groceries she and other experts suggest that the average shopper should think twice before buying in bulk at Costco:

  • Breakfast cereal
  • Ground coffee
  • Condiments and sauces, such as soy sauce
  • Flour
  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Spices

If you compare these items, especially the Kirkland brand, to similar products youɽ find at the grocery store simply on price, Costco usually wins. However, the reason grocery experts put these items in the "don't buy" category comes down to the size.

The containers or packages are simply too big to end up being a good value for the average person.

Sure, some folks with big families, an extra freezer or lots of pantry space may think these are a good deal. In many cases, though, you'll end up throwing a good portion of the food away or struggle to find room for it in your home.

"A normal family is just never going to get through the quantity you have to purchase," Haugsven says. That's especially true on items like soy sauce, spice mixes and produce. If you live by yourself, springing for Costco's 1-pound container of fresh spinach, for example, may not make sense, though it is a steal at $4.99. That's because, even if it's stored properly, fresh spinach will usually only last 5 to 7 days in the refrigerator, according to shelf-life guide site StillTasty.com.

Large quantities can also be unwieldy to store. Though grocery stores usually sell flour in 5-pound sacks, Costco sells it in 25-pound packages, and it can be difficult to find space for all of that. "I would never want to store 25 pounds of flour. That's a whole year's worth of flour in advance," Haugsven says.


Don't buy these 8 foods at Costco, experts say

Costco can be a great place to find good deals on the foods you eat every day. But there are a few areas where your local grocery store or a big box store like Walmart and Target can offer better value for your money.

That's especially true when it comes to size. Because Costco generally sells products in bulk, to get the most out of your purchase, you need to make sure you can consume the larger quantities of a product before it goes bad. For ordinary families or individuals, that can be a high bar to clear.

That's primarily why Charlene Haugsven, founder of MyFrugalAdventures.com, tells CNBC Make It, "Just because Costco has it doesn't mean it's a bargain."

Here are the eight types of groceries she and other experts suggest that the average shopper should think twice before buying in bulk at Costco:

  • Breakfast cereal
  • Ground coffee
  • Condiments and sauces, such as soy sauce
  • Flour
  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Spices

If you compare these items, especially the Kirkland brand, to similar products youɽ find at the grocery store simply on price, Costco usually wins. However, the reason grocery experts put these items in the "don't buy" category comes down to the size.

The containers or packages are simply too big to end up being a good value for the average person.

Sure, some folks with big families, an extra freezer or lots of pantry space may think these are a good deal. In many cases, though, you'll end up throwing a good portion of the food away or struggle to find room for it in your home.

"A normal family is just never going to get through the quantity you have to purchase," Haugsven says. That's especially true on items like soy sauce, spice mixes and produce. If you live by yourself, springing for Costco's 1-pound container of fresh spinach, for example, may not make sense, though it is a steal at $4.99. That's because, even if it's stored properly, fresh spinach will usually only last 5 to 7 days in the refrigerator, according to shelf-life guide site StillTasty.com.

Large quantities can also be unwieldy to store. Though grocery stores usually sell flour in 5-pound sacks, Costco sells it in 25-pound packages, and it can be difficult to find space for all of that. "I would never want to store 25 pounds of flour. That's a whole year's worth of flour in advance," Haugsven says.


Watch the video: BOXED VS. COSTCO. WHICH ONE IS CHEAPER?! IM SHOCKED! (May 2022).